The Nile in Cairo

1-11-2005
التقييم 3.0 بواسطة (2) قارئ 9 قراءة


The Nile in Cairo



Photos by: Ashraf Abul-Yazid


Those were not just names carried by signs on small boats,
floating restaurants and vessels sailing on the waters of the Nile in Cairo, but
to me they represented moving signs of Nile tales about Cairo s visitors,
transit travellers and residents, as they were moments written on the crest of
the waves. The names were not the only things carried by the signs, but these
carried brief inspiring phrases as well. The stylish restaurants adhered to
foreign names, reflecting marked class divisions, even on the surface of the
Nile which has taken in all meanings and their significance.

If you are able to reduce Egypt to a city, you may choose Cairo,
being aware, however, that there are other cities bearing different hallmarks.
Nevertheless, the capital alone distils Egypt as the sky distils rain gathered
from countless clouds after crossing wide borders. If you choose Cairo as a
place which reflects Egypt, nobody will argue, as Egypt s journey would not have
been possible but for the River Nile. Its civilization grew only on its banks,
and life started and continued only with the flow of its waves which quenched
the thirst of both land and man. Egypt is the gift of the Nile ..Yes and Cairo
is its daughter.

Egypt s capital throughout its successive civilizations spread from
south to north, not far from its banks. When Caliph Umar urged his commander Amr
Ibn Al-Ass not to let any water separate him from the Muslims he chose the
location of Al-Fustat, which then represented the narrowest and easiest crossing
between its banks, at a time when water crossing was a major barrier. But
Al-Fustat, being a military town, was only possible to protect by the Nile from
one side, as it was protected by the hill from the other side.

Cairo, the largest desert city, is 414 square metres in area, let
alone its current extensions. In the middle of the desert it looks like a sea of
sand struggling against many forces and is affected by more currents. Cairo is
like the desert whose caravans combined the distant and near countries of the
Middle East.

Since the dawn of history, visitors and tourists have been flooding
into the city s location. Assuming an Arabic name though, its location had
attracted considerable attention long before the Arabs spread out from their
peninsula. At the location where the Nile is wide enough embrace the land of the
Delta.

Which takes the shape of a paper fan, the Pharaohs established
their capital, Memphis. The Sakkara step pyramid, the oldest stone building in
the world, is still overlooking the Memphis tombs which can be seen with the
naked eye from atop high-rise buildings in Cairo, unless shrouded by pollution.
The Pharaohs built their main tombs on the Giza Plateau, which is only 40
minutes by Bus 8 from the centre of Cairo, Tahrir Square, as reported by Desmond
Stewart in his book Cairo Forty Years Ago . In a painting by the French artist
Nestore Lahotte (1878) in his book Panorama of Egypt and Nubia we see how the4
Nile was playing at a stone s throw from the Pyramids, and on it travel the
boats of the sun and people. The goods carried by the travellers to Cairo or its
location were not only for trade but they carried religious ideas as well, which
the Nile carried from north to south, and from south to north alike.

Layer upon layer, like onion layers, as the popular saying in Egypt
goes the lover s onion is a lamb , each layer representing a different cultural
layer depending on the colour and thickness of its texture. In AD 1384 the
Italian merchant Leonardo Friscobaldi wrote that Cairo s streets were more
crowded than Florence s. The population was less than half a million, almost
double the population of Paris, the largest European city in the fourteenth
century, and five times as much as that of Constantinople. Max Rodenbeck said in
his book Cairo, the Victorious City that Cairo in the Middle Ages was like New
York today.

Since that golden age, Cairo has known the grandeur of Mameluke
architecture, which represented the crown jewel of Islamic architecture in
Egypt: tall, impressive minerals, stone domes, fine marble and coloured stone
mihrab inscriptions and wooden Quranic verses ... ... ... Marks of the past
carried by almost 200 antiquities in Cairo, including mosques, palaces, public
fountains, hospitals and museums built over seven centuries ago, but most of
which are still being used for the same purpose, including Sultan Hassan Mosque,
which for its splendour and magnificent architecture -in addition to its huge
costs-was described as the pyramid of Islamic architecture and the crown jewel
of Mameluke architecture. It was not only a mosque but a school for teaching the
four sects and a hospital. More famous as the pyramids may be, the Mameluke
archtecture in Cairo will be more majestic if properly attended to. That was
before Cairo, Egypt and the Arab countries fell behind the Ottoman iron curtain,
and Vasco da Gama s discovery of the Cape of Good Hope route (1498) and the
discovery of America six years earlier, when Columbus set foot on the New World,
which made Europe chart is navigational maps and changed Cairo s demography and
diminished the importance of its Nile as far as its transit traders were
concerned.

Cairo needed centuries to regain its importance, either through
expeditions to discover the sources of the Nile or military expeditions which
recognized the secret of its timeless location.

History repeats itself, and as Alexander had done it 2000 years
before, Napoleon Bonaparte followed him cherishing a more ambitious dream: I saw
myself as a preacher exploring Asia riding on an elephant, wearing a turban,
carrying a new holy book, which I will rewrite myself to meet my needs . Between
AD 1798 and 1801 Cairo and Arab cities to the north and neighbouring cities in
Egypt and Palestine witnessed an expedition which failed militarily but achieved
one success, namely the writing of Description d Egypte by a (French)
multidisciplinary team of 154 scientists, painters, anthropologists and
physicians. This 24-volume encyclopedia reviewed the country s memory and
rediscovered it to the world at the same time, and even paved the way for the
British to maintain their presence for a century to come and to end the
collision of Egypt s rulers from the Mohammed Ali dynasty with them with the
rise to power for the first time of the Egyptian military in 1952.

Around a century prior to that revolutionary history, Egypt, with a
population of 600,000 was a haven for Europeans and Americans fleeing from the
fog and cold of their towns, and cotton merchants and craftsmen who sought the
comfort of a rich, cosmopolitan city where grocers were Greeks, mechanics
Italians, watchmakers Austrians, pharmacists British, hoteliers Swiss and
merchants Jews. The night was for dancing in Clubs, the day for horse race
gambling and the afternoon for having a meal on the bank of the Nile. That was
Cairo of Khedive Ismail who aspired to make his capital a copy of European
capitals and to rebuild it as Haussmann did in Paris. The Khedive built his new
city to the west of the old one to be closer to the Nile and diverted the course
of the Nile to run through the city center. His choice of Ali Mubarak, a
French-educated man, as Minister of Public Works, might have been meant to be a
link in the chain of Cairo s modernization. But Ismail s reliance on the
proceeds of the sale of cotton during the cotton and cotton market boom, which
is similar to the oil boom today, was short- lived. Egypt was burdened with
debts which were heavier than the sky which was lit up by the stars of Verdi s
Opera, guests to the inaugural ceremony of the Suez Canal, and Azbakiya Park s
lovers.

That situation continued until the British occupied Egypt to secure
settlement of the debts due to them.

The Nile Corniche

When you come to Egypt by plane from east or west and look through
the window when the captain announces that Cairo is in sight, you will see
nothing but desert on the right or left of the Nile, but when you come from the
north it is a different story, as the green Delta prepares you to receive the
great river and the capital which crosses it. I hold my camera closer to the
window and take many shots of Cairo and its Nile, where two islands lie in its
heart, the one marked by the Cairo Tower, the Opera and Museum of Egyptian
Contemporary Art, and the other Rawdah Island, at the tail-end of which the
Nilometre is located. Rawdah and Gazeera s green disappears gradually and is cut
by ugly cement high-rise towers which devour millions of pounds from the people
who want to live by the Nile, but to their dismay, discover that it is all but
hidden and they need to put a mirror in its sky to be able to see it or just
hang its pictures on the wall. Except for the hotels and lucky towers close to
the Nile, almost nobody in Cairo can see it.

You will ask yourself: who goes to the Nile earliest? Fishermen,
walkers, travellers or elegant restaurant- goers ? As a matter of fact contact
between the Nile and the people of the unsleeping city continues round the
clock. As mosque-goers at dawn praise and glorify Allah, they take over from the
unsleeping, noise never abates for the duration of the day. The Nile sees what
goes around it, and is seen by all. But what s the relationship between the
silent giant and screaming little beings inflicted sometimes by tension and
feebleness, and by misery and greed other times.

When you step off the pavement on the Nile Corniche from a point in
front of the TV complex on your way to Kasr El Nile Bridge and before you are
confronted with the morning noise, you can hear the rustle of thin camphor trees
or enjoy the morning breeze, until the sun shines, under an acacia tree
listening to birds exchanging words of love on a sycamore tree avoiding the
summer heat.

After a while the same pavement will be filled with lupite, kernel
and peanuts sellers and their customers who are passers-by or loiterers, as well
as those who prepare to get down to the anchorage, where sailing and motor boats
are moored and ready to receive lovers, families and schoolchildren who love
going by the river bus to the Barrages built by Mohammed Ali the north of Cairo
to spend a day there enjoying its meadoms and green spaces until the time of the
last bus back whose engines make a noise louder that the dandling of children,
the shouting on skippers and the noise of young singers noise. The Barrages are
a symbol of the central location of Cairo, because it is situated at the top of
the Delta, as if it were a tap, and whoever owns such a tap in a desert country
owns the entire country. And it is from here that the Nile branches into arms
watering the Delta. Cairo lies exactly under the Delta at a site where the Nile
branches into two main tributaries Rasetta and Damietta.

I had to sail on the Nile more than once to prepare for the journey
of writing and to make my relationship with its waters not just watching from
the outside and so that my lines might not be merely reminiscences of boyhood
and youth. With the countless times I got down to the anchorage boat owners got
used to seeing me.

I was then faced by a key question from the boat owner on the Nile
cruise in Cairo: Motor or sail? Many people prefer motor boats because they are
faster and can cross the bridges on the Nile, and the sound -of motors is only
eclipsed by youth songs. Those who prefer peace and quiet and would like to talk
to one another and want to hear rhythmic Nile water more than rhythmless songs,
choose sailing boats, as a homesick return to the pre-machine age, as if the
sail meant passion, but the motor was preoccupied with something else. The
skipper playing hard on the bars, making a pleasant sound, and the air moving
the sail and filling the lungs with air. And as far as the eye can see a girl
leans to touch the water with her little palm. Whenever she touches the water I
feel cold, as if the Nile passed through her fingers to play with my forearm.

Forty years ago, you could hire a felucca steered by a brown-faced
boatman from Upper Egypt for just five shillings (a quarter pound). Today, the
cruise costs £E 50 for half an hour. It is not the journey, of the river alone,
but the journey of the local currency and its purchasing power as well, and it
is the Nile s mirror that can best reflect this.

You may wish to test all the colours which the Nile reflects and
changes every hour, even every minute. At midnight, the Nile shines and glitters
like steel, as if it were drops of molten metal in the moonlight. At dawn it is
a mixture of colours like a peacock tail. A little while after sunrise the Nile
water looks like butter. At noon it becomes greenish, and in the afternoon, with
the sun sending out its rays in all directions, the water turns golden. When it
is time for you to, or all but, drown, its eyes redden, and it closes its
eyelids and becomes a mirror or subdued colours in huge hotels and luxurious
boats.

On the floating houses and dahabies we lived with the heroes and
heroines of the novels of Naguib Mahfouz, who treated the Nile as his favourite
part of Cairo and used to walk along it every day before the assassination
attempt against him. Today the floating restaurants have become the alternative
life for many heroes in novels, films and life multi-storey restaurants
presenting the Nile for diners and pleasure seekers. From my seat in the boat,
Kasr El Nile Bridge looks like a huge balcony The bridge was built in 1871, but
its current shape was completed 65 ago and was built by Doorman Long & Co.,
the same company which built the famous Sydney Harbour. From this balcony,
onlookers can see boats passing under them carrying lovers and pleasure-seekers.
Because it connects more than one special place, such as the Opera on the left
and the American University on the right, it looks like a pavement with two
lions from one side and two from the other side acting as guards. You don t know
whether the lions guard the bridge or the passers-by. The bridge s old name Lion
Father may explain people s feeling upon seeing the four lions on both sides.

At nightfall the moon tries to rise behind the ugly billboards
which all but obscure vision, as if the Nile weren t polluted enough and
accepted visual pollution caused by the advertising hoardings which do not
preserve the dignity of the Nile or onlookers and became a massive iron wall
carrying ridiculous faces advertising everything, but in fact they advertise one
thing :Deteriorating public taste which allowed it to encroach on the Nile and
make it all but unable to breathe, having blocked the space in front of it.

The Nile Flood and Nilometre

In 1798, Monsieur Luber, a member of the French scientific
expedition which accompanied the French army upon its occupation of Egypt,
wanted to document the Nile floods recorded from 1150 A. H to 1215 A.H, which
Amin Sami Pasha compiled in his almanac of the Nile and added to it from many
sources. The Nile flood was deemed inadequate if it measured 18 20 cubits weak
if 20 22 cubits, good if over 22.5 cubits, severe if over 24 cubits. Severe
floods were no doubt disastrous and so was its drought, however different the
degree of severity and drought and their consequences might have been.

As previously mentioned, the Nilometre is located on the Rawdah
Island, which has been inhabited since the days of the Pharaohs, who had their
own Nilometre in the same site. Rawdah was a harbour and a shipyard, and was
even described as a Paradise in the Arabian Nights before it fell prey to the
huge cement high-rise towers. What was in the past a wide canal separating the
island from the Nile bank has now been reduced to a narrow isthmus between the
island and the corniche over which is a wooden bridge leading to the Nilometre
which was built in AD 861.Quranic verses are engraved on its walls. Upon leaving
the Nilometre and a little farther to the left you will find Al Manasterli
Palace, built in 1851 on the site which was occupied by the Nilometre mosque.
The palace is now used as a centre for arts, especially international concerts.
To complete the arts space you wil pass by Om Kolthum Museum. You may hear a
distant echo of her voice while singing for the Nile sounding in your ears, or
Mohammed Abdul Wahhab s voice praising the brown Nile in the Nahawand rhythm:

The Nile is brown, sweet and smart... ... looks wonderful in gold
and marble, playing a flute, praising and glorifying God. It is the lifeblood of
our country. May God boost it ! She said she hankered for an hour in a felucca
on its water. At a distance from where we were I saw a Pigeon flying to a fro
from over the water. I stood up and called the felucca man. Could you please
come forward and take us. He answered in an angelic voice: Welcome !

The Nile derives its brownness from the flood which carries
alluvium , which is the objective correlative to fertility. The eagerly -
awaited Nile flood took place in late August every year when the whole city went
out to celebrate it. In our childhood that was known as the Nile Completion
feast. In the years when the Nile was feared not to flood, Cairo s streets were
filled with crowds of supplicants who went out from the streets on the eastern
bank led by the Sultan and clergymen of all faiths to offer up a prayer for
rain.

As Al-Maqrizi said: In Shawwal 362 AH (July AD 972) the Fatimid Al
Moez Lideen Allah prohibited heralding the Nile flood and ordered people to
write in this respect to him or to the Commander Jawhar of Cicily . When the
Nilometre measured at least 16 cubits, he allowed the announcement. What a
wonderful policy! When there was no or slight flood people worried and refrained
from selling their crops awaiting a price increase, and those who had enough
money stored the crops, either to charge higher prices or keep foodstuffs for
their families, thus causing higher levels of prices.

Another custom was practised on the night of 11 June, namely the
Drop Night, which took place in the eleventh Coptic month Baouna , in which it
was believed a sacred drop of rain fell at night causing the flood. Most of
Cairo s inhabitants, especially those who believed in the Drop Night, spent it
on the banks of the Nile, and even some women cut moulds of dough representing a
family member each hoping to catch the drop, and when the morning dawned they
believed the person whom the piece that caught the drop of rain represented to
be long-lived, and through it predicted the volume of the Nile flood, as
recorded by Edward William Lean in 1834 in his account of the customs of the
Egyptians related to the Nile.

Another custom related to the great river was the Nile herald who
used to go out giving the good news of the Nile flood, starting with praising
Allah, pronouncing peace and blessings on the Noble Prophet, thanking the
government and praying for its safety, bringing the glad tidings to the people.
As we know, the Pharaohs believed that the flood resulted from some of Isis
tears crying for Osiris. Their rituals included sacrificing a bride who was
given away to the loving Nile. Many scholars denied this legend and said it was
similar today to a doll in the size of a girl thrown away into it, perhaps after
the danger of drought had disappeared.

The Nile has witnessed a number of dams which control the course of
its life. In 1902 the Aswan Dam was built and a series of barrages was built
later: Assiut (1902), Zefta (1903), Isna (1909), Nag Hamadi (1930). In 1958 a
loan agreement was signed between Egypt and the Soviet Union, under which the
former borrowed 400 million roubles from the latter to finance the first phase
of the High Dam. Work started in 1960 and the project was completed ten years
later and was formally inaugurated in January 1971. The dam meant hope for a
better life, but, like all major projects, was an environmental disaster, like
accumulating alluvium which negatively affected the fertility of the Nile, and
inundated many Nubian villages. After Nasser s death, projects to remove
alluvium in front of the dam stopped.

However, what is worrisome about the Nile today is not more serious
than pollution. There are 80 agricultural discharge points along the Nile from
Aswan to the Mediterranean. The wastewater contains organic fertilizers, in
addition to 59 artificial discharge points along the course itself carrying
heavy metals and toxic and organic substances which are harmful to health. The
longest river in the world (6825km), and the only river which discharges into
the Mediterranean and flows alone for 2700 km in a long journey across the
desert with a force that makes it in no need for a tributary to support it, is
thus threatened with enormous human dangers.

I wonder: have we forgotten one of our forefathers addressing the
Nile saying: Praise be to you, the Nile, which springs from the earth to feed
Egypt. You are the light which comes out of the darkness. When you flood, people
offer sacrifices to you and slaughter cattle and organize a big festival. The
Nile, according to the Ancient Egyptians 'is the one which goes on time or comes
back on time, brings food and supplies, and joy and delight. Very loved. The
master of water which grows green. People compete in his service. It is
respected by the gods. Today s Egyptians have to reread history to restore some
of the Nile s dignity..

The Capital of destinies:

We go northwards to the Nile in Cairo. Another traditional custom
associated with the Nile survived the ages from the Pharaohs days with typical
Egyptian variations: Sham El Nasim Day, which coincides with the first day of
the Khamasin, on which many people go out to the Cairene gardens, or their
remains around or inside the Nile to eat all they can from salted fish, green
onions and coloured eggs. I wonder if there is still room in their hearts for
the main objective of going out that day, namely breathing fresh air. I doubt
it.

Breathing fresh air and enjoying the sight of water were more
available when, at the turn of the twentieth century, the Nile cut through Cairo
. a gulf that was the first passage receiving the flood waters from an estuary
which later disappeared to move in the direction of Al Mouski Street. That gulf
which was overlooked by houses on both sides earned the city the name of Venice
of the East. But everything has changed. The gulf disappeared and the street was
renamed many times, and its ends are only connected with crowds and car bodies
and scrap. Not only have the Nile course and tributaries changed, but they were
also encroached on by high-rise blocks which competed in ugliness and
infringement of the largest portion of green spaces on the Nile s banks or
islands.

Today, more than half of the cars in Egypt travel on the streets of
Cairo, and half of Egypt s population spend their day in the capital. Unusually,
Egypt is a country whose capital is in control of its destinies. That s why
people call Cairo Misr (Egypt), a spontaneous real reduction. The Nile bears
witness to all that, a silent witness, unbearably draining away Cairo s land,
sea and water.

Rodenbeck used to compare Cairo to New York, but today the
comparison is unfair, unless we take the American city s skyscrapers to be
similar to Cairo s crowded flyovers and roads, hence restoring its standing as
possessor of a chaotic network of cement lines, flyovers and tunnels which are
crowded with people, vehicles, trains, motorcycles, horse-drawn carts and other
means of transport which never stop on both banks of the calm Nile.

With the writer Khalid Yusuf I went to the Marine Club, which is
frequented by its members and others. Among its advantage is its closeness to,
even touching, the Nile waters from its long terrace. It is also close to a
building which after reconstruction will be Museum of the July Revolution
Leaders. Facing the British Embassy on the other side, my friend told me that at
early in the July free officer s rule, when Abdul Latif EL-Baghdadi, member of
the RCC, was appointed Minister of Municipal and Rural Affairs, and the
revolution government was keen to introduce a tangible achievement to ordinary
citizens and the middle class, it decided to build a new corniche along the
Nile, from Shubra Al-Khaimah to Helwan, so that the Nile might become the
property of the people rather than of the palaces which lie on the private
beaches. The main building which had to be removed and to reroute the road in
front of it was the British Embassy in Cairo, which still occupies the same
place. But after the garden overlooking the Nile and its anchorage were lost, El
Baghdadi requested the Embassy to vacate a part of the garden and anchorage to
build the road for public use. When the embassy procrastinated and thus delayed
the project, his patience ran out quickly and he sent his bulldozers to pull
down the walls and take over the necessary area to complete the corniche,
thereby providing a road between the embassy and the river, a road for the
people to go down, a symbolic gesture of the return of the Nile to its people.
Dusk is falling, and the Nile has almost but finished telling its tales, voicing
its complains from the city which it gave love and affection and donated life
and so became the largest urban oasis in the desert, but the city returned its
love with some disregard affection with negligence, and life with pollution.
However, the Nile is still singing, and we still love it.





Ashraf Abul-Yazid

Cover
Arab flags on an Egyptian boat. The dream of unity coming true
on the face of Cairo’s Nile. Names carry not only an Egyptian taste but also a
touch of colloquial, classical and foreign words
Arab flags on an Egyptian boat. The dream of unity coming true
on the face of Cairo’s Nile. Names carry not only an Egyptian taste but also a
touch of colloquial, classical and foreign words
Arab flags on an Egyptian boat. The dream of unity coming true
on the face of Cairo’s Nile. Names carry not only an Egyptian taste but also a
touch of colloquial, classical and foreign words
Arab flags on an Egyptian boat. The dream of unity coming true
on the face of Cairo’s Nile. Names carry not only an Egyptian taste but also a
touch of colloquial, classical and foreign words
Arab flags on an Egyptian boat. The dream of unity coming true
on the face of Cairo’s Nile. Names carry not only an Egyptian taste but also a
touch of colloquial, classical and foreign words
Arab flags on an Egyptian boat. The dream of unity coming true
on the face of Cairo’s Nile. Names carry not only an Egyptian taste but also a
touch of colloquial, classical and foreign words
Arab flags on an Egyptian boat. The dream of unity coming true
on the face of Cairo’s Nile. Names carry not only an Egyptian taste but also a
touch of colloquial, classical and foreign words
Arab flags on an Egyptian boat. The dream of unity coming true
on the face of Cairo’s Nile. Names carry not only an Egyptian taste but also a
touch of colloquial, classical and foreign words
When you approach Egypt from the north, the green Delta will
prepare you to receive the great river and the capital which it passes through
as an artery struggling to keep Cairo’s body alive
The Ancient Egyptian used to deify the Nile, and it is
reported that at flood time and to celebrate that occasion they used to throw
the Bride of the Nile into it as an expression of their joy at the
coming
In AD 1384 an Italian merchant wrote that Cairo’s streets were
more crowded than Florence’s Cairo’s population then was less than half a
million, an approximate number double the population of Paris, the largest
European city in the fourteenth century
Conversation with the boat owner on a Nile cruise in Cairo
begins with a key question: ' Motor or sail?” Many people prefer motor boats
because they are fast and able to cross the bridges on the Nile
Conversation with the boat owner on a Nile cruise in Cairo
begins with a key question: ' Motor or sail?” Many people prefer motor boats
because they are fast and able to cross the bridges on the Nile
Rawdah was a harbour and a shipyard and was even described as
a paradise in the Arabian Nights before it fell prey to the huge cement
high-rise towers. What was in the past a wide canal separating the island from
the Nile bank has now been reduced
The greenness of the Rawdah and Gazaeera islands is receding,
having been encroached on by ugly, huge cement high-rise apartment blocks which
devour millions of pounds from those wishing to live by the Nile but to their
dismay
A huge crowd crossing the Nile in Cairo grieving over the loss
of their leader Nasser. The two lions of Kasr El- Nile Bridge witness silently,
while the Nile recounts the tales of the ancestors to the new generation.
Photograph by John Phiney
A night view of the Nile in Cairo where the lights scattered
on the crest of the waves, rather than the Capital’s breeze, touch your face
gently. How long will this scene continue ? Nobody can tell, looking at the ugly
billboards that all but hide sky
A night view of the Nile in Cairo where the lights scattered
on the crest of the waves, rather than the Capital’s breeze, touch your face
gently. How long will this scene continue ? Nobody can tell, looking at the ugly
billboards that all but hide sky
Two photographs of the Nile Corniche: Pleasure-seekers, and a
poor breadwinner – two complementary scenes. You may wonder who goes out to the
Nile earliest? Fisherman, strollers, travellers or stylish restaurant
customers?
Two photographs of the Nile Corniche: Pleasure-seekers, and a
poor breadwinner – two complementary scenes. You may wonder who goes out to the
Nile earliest? Fisherman, strollers, travellers or stylish restaurant
customers?
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